Revisiting The Road

Revisiting The Road

I was talking with a young man yesterday about the importance of travel. In the midst of loud music and sips (or in my case, gulps and stutters) of our drinks, I advised him to leave the country, see different sites. I remember a conversation like this years ago; an older man who I looked to for guidance had implored me to see the world. I liked this guy; he was always in a good mood and loved people. He had a sense of gravitas that I always admired and…

The Minimising of Sexual Assault of Black Boys

The Minimising of Sexual Assault of Black Boys

Growing up, I would hear stories from my male friends about how their baby sitters would kiss them or touch them in inappropriate ways. My friends would talk about making out with a “play aunt” or having sex with a family friend. It was not looked upon as a bad thing; in fact, it was something they bragged about. This was a rite of passage to many of us.

No, I Don’t Accept Your Apology

No, I Don’t Accept Your Apology

When I was younger, I would do and say things out of anger. I’d get mad and yell. I would regret the things I said and after some time, I would apologize. My Mother would accept my apology, but as I continued to do those things, she would get tired of my routine. One day after throwing a tantrum and apologizing after, she said, “You know, you keep saying you are sorry, and at some point it doesn’t mean anything.” I thought about that. I wanted my word and actions…

TEDxWilsonPark – How I Overcame My Fear of Stuttering

TEDxWilsonPark – How I Overcame My Fear of Stuttering

One of my goals in life was to speak at a TED event, and I got a chance to do so in Sept. 2018. TEDxWilsonPark in Florence, Alabama held their inaugural event and I was invited to share my talk “How I Overcame My Fear of Stuttering.” I spoke about growing up with a stutter, the obstacles I faced, how my confidence was affected, and how I used this to power past my insecurities and pursue my dreams. This TEDx is for everyone who is struggling with something and don’t…

Allyship is a verb

Allyship is a verb

Black folks are tired. I mean worn out, depleted, and exhausted. The marathon of life and the hate we experience has got us debilitated. Drained of power and desire to talk with white folks about what it means to be Black, our struggle, and attempting to justify why we should not be terrorized. We are out of ways to tell white America why we are deserving of respect and peace. Black people cannot describe our lives enough. We have said everything and done everything. It is over. This is the…